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  • Jun.03.2012

    ​While I've performed and spoken on SharePoint 2007 to 2010 upgrades for quite some time now, recently we have become involved in a number of large migration projects for corporate clients.  One of the bigger challenges in these upgrades has been identifying the features required for the sites in 2010, and determining a strategy for supporting them.

    When we are doing 2010 upgrades, we generally recommend taking a content database attach approach to the upgrade.  I'm not a fan on in place upgrades, due to the fact that we don't know the health of the 2007 farm, and we genreally don't want to bring that legacy of potential issues with us through the upgrade.  One of the main reasons for doing the upgrade (aside from getting to 2010) is to get a clean, well-built, and well-documented 2010 environment to work in, which means a fresh build.

    To determine the features needed, we will often do a the following PowerShell command to test the upgrade.

    Test-SPContentDatabase -name dbName -webapplication siteUrl

    This will generate the same upgrade error log as actually attaching the content database, and we can review that to determine the missing features.  When we are ready to actually attach the databse, we can do that with the following:

     Mount-SPContentDatabase -name dbName -webapplication siteUrl

    To review the errors and warnings from a number of content database attaches, do the following:

    1. Go to the C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\LOGS folder
    2. Copy the relevant Upgrade...-error.log files to an empty temp folder
    3. Use Visual Studio or SQL Management Studio to do a Find in Files of [ERROR] or [WARNING], and find all files.  This will give you an output of all the error or warning lines in all the error logs

    Once we have tested or performed the upgrade, the challenge is determining the features needed.  The upgrade error log simply reports the missing feature IDs, not what they actually are.  To determine the features themselves, we use one of two techniques.

    The first technique involves accessing the 2007 production farm.  We perform these steps:

    1. Go to the C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\TEMPLATE\FEATURES folder
    2. Use Visual Studio or SQL Management Studio to do a Find in Files of the desired feature ID
    3. Use the folder name to identify the feature name

    An alternative technique involves having a repository of all the WSP solution files used on the production farm.  With those perform the following:

    1. Copy the WSP files to a temp location
    2. Open a command prompt to that location
    3. Run rename *.wsp *.cab to rename all the WSP files to CAB files
    4. Open each CAB file and extract the contents to a sub-folder of the same name
    5. Use Visual Studio or SQL Management Studio to do a Find in Files of the desired feature ID
    6. Use the folder name to identify the feature name

     

  • Nov.15.2011

    Day One of TechDays 2011 in Vancouver is done now too, and both my sessions went very well.  Damir from Microsoft will be making the recorded sessions available, which I'll re-post as soon as we get them.  For those of you in the Montreal area, I will also be delivering this talk at that TechDays, on Nov 29-30. 

    TechDays 2011 - CLB379 - SharePoint 2010 Extranets and Authentication

    As promised I'm providing a lot of the content I showed.  This includes a new Excel worksheets for planning out SharePoint FBA and ADFS implementations that actually generates the required web.config entries and PowerShell script needed to complete the installation.  Check them out here:

    TechDays 2011 - CLB376 - Upgrading and Migrating to SharePoint 2010, On-Premise and in the Cloud

    Here's the TechDays 2011 - CLB376 - Upgrading and Migrating to SharePoint 2010, On-Premise and in the Cloud presentation.

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  • Oct.26.2011

    Day One of TechDays 2011 in Toronto is wrapped, and my session on SharePoint Extranets went very well. Good feedback from the audience at the Congress Centre.

    Damir from Microsoft will be making the recorded sessions available, which I'll re-post as soon as we get them. In the meantime, here's the TechDays 2011 - CLB379 - SharePoint 2010 Extranets and Authentication presentation.

    More importantly for many, as promised I'm also including a copy of the LAB SQL FBA Configuration Checklist Excel that I demonstrated in the session. It helps organize the implementation of forms-based authentication in SharePoint 2010.

    For those of you in the Vancouver and Montreal areas, I will also be delivering this talk at those TechDays, on November 15-16, and 29-30, respectively.

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  • Oct.26.2011

    Day One of TechDays 2011 in Toronto is wrapped, and my session on Upgrading to SharePoint 2010 went very well. Good feedback from the audience at the Congress Centre.

    Damir from Microsoft will be making the recorded sessions available, which I'll re-post as soon as we get them. In the meantime, here's the TechDays 2011 - CLB376 - Upgrading and Migrating to SharePoint 2010, On-Premise and in the Cloud presentation.

    For those of you in the Vancouver and Montreal areas, I will also be delivering this talk at those TechDays, on November 15-16, and 29-30, respectively.

    ...
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  • Mar.20.2011

    I know it's long after the event, but I just got back onto the TechDays 2010 site and noticed that the videos from the Toronto sessions are available there now.  You can go to http://www.microsoft.com/canada/techdays/online/tab-2.aspx and see the session the Bill Brockbank and I delivered titled CLB372: Upgrading Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 to SharePoint Server 2010.

  • Apr.19.2010

    To start with, you should probably begin with my Upgrading a MOSS 2007 WCM Site to 2010  post.

    Once the 2007 content database and site has been restored and upgraded to 2010, go to the Site Settings (e.g.  http://sharepoint2010/_layouts/settings.aspx )

    The Settings pages should have the original “2007” look to them.   To upgrade the Settings site to the new 2010 branding, you will need to located the Visual Upgrade feature.

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  • Apr.19.2010

    Last week I delivered a web content management session (including upgrading from 2007 to 2010) at the SharePoint Summit.  For a copy of the presentation deck, please refer to Upgrading from MOSS and Leveraging WCM in SharePoint 2010.pptx

    For details on the process we followed to upgrade the master page, see my Converting 2007 branding masterpages to 2010 post.

  • Feb.24.2010

    I spoke last week on web content management in 2010.  The talk gave an overview of WCM in SharePoint, and then we went through two scenarios.  The first was a live upgrade of a 2007 to 2010, followed by a new net build.

    For the upgrade we used the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario's Intranet site called Tickr.  This is a MOSS 2007 site that we launched for the HSFO last summer.  As part of Microsoft's Rapid Deployment Program, we are working with HSFO to create a 2010 version of the site (along with a net new Board of Directors portal in 2010).

    For the net new build, we are working with Samuel & Sons on building a new public web site, also as part of Microsoft's 2010 RDP program.

    I've made the PowerPoint slide deck from the presentation available as a download.  You can find it at What's New in Web Content Management in SharePoint 2010 2010-02-17.

    I promised during the session to post the details of the upgrade process, so I've created another post at Upgrading a MOSS 2007 WCM Site to 2010.

  • Feb.24.2010

    So you want to upgrade your MOSS 2007 web content management site to SharePoint 2010?  Here's my recipe of the process we've been following.  Note that this was last updated on the RC version of SharePoint 2010.

    The following are the steps that you need to go through:

    1. You need to be on MOSS 2007 first.  If you're coming from SPS 2003 or CMS 2002, there is no direct upgrade path to SP2010
    2. You need to have SP2 installed on your MOSS 2007 environment.  This is the only supported path, and SP2 includes some tools for preparing for the upgrade
    3. You can do either an in-place upgrade or a database attach.  In-place means you actually upgrade the server that is running MOSS 2007.  This doesn't give you an easy fallback position, so we're not fans of it.  Content database attach means you attach a backup of the content database to a new SP2010 farm.  Much safer
    4. First step is to run the pre-upgrade checker on your MOSS 2007 server - Stsadm –o preupgradecheck
    5. Review the log file that comes out of this, and perform any appropriate cleanup to your 2007 farm prior to performing the upgrade.  We recommend running this step periodically even if your upgrade isn't planned  for some time
    6. Prepare your new 2010 farm.  You'll need Windows Server 64-bit for both the SharePoint and SQL servers, and SQL Server needs to be 64-bit
    7. Backup your existing database through SQL Server Management Studio
    8. Restore it to the 2010 farm's SQL Server
    9. Create a new web application on the 2010 farm
    10. Delete the content DB that was provisioned with the web application
    11. Attach the content database to the web application with the command line Stsadm –o addcontentdb –url siteurl –databasename DBName
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  • Feb.10.2010

    I'll be speaking at the next TSPUG meeting on Wednesday, February 17, 2010.  My topic for this meeting is Web Content Management with SharePoint 2010. I'll be covering the following:

    • Overview of WCM in SharePoint (site columns, content types, master pages, and layouts)
    • Upgrading an existing MOSS 2007 WCM site to 2010
    • Content database attach upgrade
    • Steps involved in updating a master page to be SP2010 compliant
    • Building a net new SP2010 WCM site
    • Building the site columns, content types, and site structure
    • Creating the master page and layouts in SharePoint Designer
    • Building a custom component in Visual Studio 2010
    • Site deployment

    6:00pm – Pizza and social

    6:30pm – Introductions and Q&A

    6:50pm – Web Content Management in SharePoint 2010

    8:30pm – Prizes and closing

    To register, click here http://www.clicktoattend.com/?id=145706

  • Nov.23.2009

    If you've read my last post at Accessing SQL 2008 Express, you'll be up to date on our upgrade plans.  We've restored the database to our new environment, and we're ready to attach it.  Before starting that there are a few caveats:

    • We still haven't gotten our production web server updated with SP2.  I know we should, and we will shortly, but in the interim I used a content database from our development server.  You need to have SP2 installed on MOSS before you can upgrade to SP2010
    • Once you've got the content database restored, you attach it with an STSADM command.  To run that successfully (see the post above for the details) you need to run the command prompt as administrator.  Failing to do that gives you a "Access denied" when you run the STSADM -o addcontentdb command

    Other than some complaints about missing features, that upgraded fine.  I wasn't ready to try installing 2007 features, so we just copied the required branding files that are normally installed by a feature (we'll do that properly later), edited the web.config to get all the controls loaded, and the site came up nicely.

    Of course we're still running in the version 3 user experience, so now the task is to update the master page to work with the new user experience.  James Brett is one of our web developers, and that's his task now.  I'll post the results of that once they become available.

  • Oct.28.2009

    So I'm back from Las Vegas, and finally getting a chance to catch my breath and start looking at the upgrade of our web site to 2010.  One of the very nice features of the upgrade to 2010 is that by default the 2007 user experience is maintained.  You can then preview the site in the 2010 user experience before you commit to moving forward.  Most of the grief you are likely to experience I expect will be with custom master pages and layouts.

    Of course our public web site has a completely customized master page and custom layouts.  From Sean’s talk, it sounded like you can go back and forth at will between user experiences.  I started by previewing the user experience, but then for whatever reason I decided to the new user experience, and not have SharePoint ask me again.  Of course the master page blew up, and my site no longer worked.  The admin pages still worked, but I couldn’t switch the experience back.  Sean’s talk had mentioned an admin command to make the switch between version 3 and 4 user experience, but I couldn’t find it in my notes.  After muddling around for a while I decided to drop the content database and start over (which was not that big a deal).

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  • Oct.21.2009

    So I’ve attended Sean Livingston’s two upgrade sessions at the SharePoint conference today (SharePoint 2010 Upgrade Part 1: Fundamentals and SharePoint 2010 Upgrade Part 2: Advanced Scenarios) and I figure I’m ready to try upgrading a MOSS 2007 site.  What better one to start with than our public web site from www.envisionit.com.

    For those of you that don’t want to read all the sordid details, the site did upgrade quite cleanly, and is now available on http://www2010.envisionit.com/Products, running under SharePoint 2010.  It still has the old user experience, but in this case that just affects authors, and not the general public.  I’ll be working through that quite soon I’m sure.  The top level site is currently broken though, as I flipped the user experience over and I can get it back just yet.

    We need to start off with a few prerequisites here.  First and foremost there are only two versions of SharePoint you can upgrade from.  They are WSS v3 SP2 and MOSS 2007 SP2.  You have to be current on SP2, and if you’re skipping versions, you still need to migrate through 2007.  That’s fine, our site is built as a publishing site on MOSS 2007, and we’ve installed SP2, so we’re good on that side.  Next is that you have to be running 64-bit servers for BOTH SharePoint and SQL.  You can use either SQL 2005 or SQL 2008, but it has to be 64-bit.

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