Sign In
Share this page on Facebook Share this page on Linkedin Share this page on Twitter Email a link to this page
Search
  • Oct.29.2009

    You may have often seen this popup come up on a public facing site that you are browsing too.  It is because the SharePoint Server is trying to load the control, and it is not in the list of pre-approved controls in IE7.  The control is used to display presence information in a SharePoint site.  This shows up as the small circle presence indicator tied into Windows Live Messenger.

    I was getting this popup on this blog site, so I thought I would share how we deal with it.  Since this is on a server that only serves public-facing content, I decided to follow the server based solution outlined below.

    This was adapted from a Microsoft SharePoint Blog article by Michael Gannotti and makes reference to Microsoft Support KB article 931509:

    http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blogs/mikeg/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=191

    ...
    [Read More]
  • Oct.29.2009

    Digital asset management is something of particular interest to me.  For those of you that aren’t aware, at Envision IT we have a number of products for image management.  You can see them at www.envisionit.com/products.  So naturally I was very interested in what was new in SP2010 for image management.

    I’ll save the image management changes with respect to web content management (WCM) for another post (there’s lots there too).  Here I want to focus on the changes to the picture library.

    For those of you that are familiar with picture libraries in MOSS 2007, you may understand that they were really second class document libraries.  Things like major/minor versions and content approvals didn’t exist in them.  Ever wonder why the Images and Site Collection Images libraries in the MOSS publishing template are not picture libraries, but rather just document libraries.  Unfortunately that means you lose the great picture library features like automatic thumbnail and web-friendly image generation, and picture metadata extraction (like image size).

    ...
    [Read More]
  • Oct.29.2009

    I’ve been meaning to get connected to the local SharePoint community for some time now.  I’ve heard good things about the Toronto SharePoint Users Group (TSPUG), and last night I decided to get out to a meeting.  Savash Alic from Microsoft Canada was out to give the first peaks at SharePoint 2010.  I had gotten to the SharePoint conference last week in Las Vegas so I had heard a much of the information, but there was just so much content in Vegas that there was no way you could get to it all.  Savash did a great job at hitting some of the highlights.  That is always a challenge, as SharePoint has become so big, there is no way you could remotely touch on it all in 90 minutes.

    If you’re interested in joining the community, I would encourage you to check out their site at http://www.tspug.com.  And for those of you that are in the west end and would rather not make the trek downtown, there is also a new Mississauga SharePoint User Group getting going.  I missed their inaugural meeting this past Monday, but their site is being graciously hosted by the Toronto group at http://www.tspug.com/mississauga.  I plan on getting involved there as well, as we are based in Mississauga, right across from the Microsoft Canada offices.

  • Oct.28.2009

    So I'm back from Las Vegas, and finally getting a chance to catch my breath and start looking at the upgrade of our web site to 2010.  One of the very nice features of the upgrade to 2010 is that by default the 2007 user experience is maintained.  You can then preview the site in the 2010 user experience before you commit to moving forward.  Most of the grief you are likely to experience I expect will be with custom master pages and layouts.

    Of course our public web site has a completely customized master page and custom layouts.  From Sean’s talk, it sounded like you can go back and forth at will between user experiences.  I started by previewing the user experience, but then for whatever reason I decided to the new user experience, and not have SharePoint ask me again.  Of course the master page blew up, and my site no longer worked.  The admin pages still worked, but I couldn’t switch the experience back.  Sean’s talk had mentioned an admin command to make the switch between version 3 and 4 user experience, but I couldn’t find it in my notes.  After muddling around for a while I decided to drop the content database and start over (which was not that big a deal).

    ...
    [Read More]
  • Oct.28.2009

    Everyone remember getting frustrated by SharePoint’s “An unexpected error has occurred” that gets displayed by default when something goes wrong in SharePoint?  Well it still happens in SP2010, but the good news is the same fix takes care of it.

    For those of you that haven’t come across the fix for this, it requires an edit to the web.config for the web application you are getting the error on.  Typically we do this on development and QA servers.  If you’re doing it in a farm, remember that you need to do the change to all front-end servers, or guarantee that you are hitting a specific web front-end.

    The web.config is found in the home directory for the web application.  This is typically c:\inetpub\wwwroot\wss\VirtualDirectories and then the folder for your web application.  To see the full errors make the following two changes.  Opening the web.config in Notepad and searching for the tags (there is only one for each) is the easiest way to do this.

    • Set: CustomErrors="Off"
    • Set: CallStack="true"

    Once you’ve done this change, you’ll see the full .NET error details and call stack for the error that occurred.

  • Oct.21.2009

    Okay, so maybe charging ahead on Beta 1 isn`t always the best idea.  I got my blog site up at blog.petercarson.ca with very little difficulty.  I pasted up a few of my posts, and things were still looking good.  We registered the DNS name, setup the rules on our ISA Server to publish it out, and voila, my blog site was live on the web.

    That’s where things went off the rails.  Our www2010.envisionit.com site is coming along nicely too, and that was published in the same way.  In both cases I wanted the sites to be available anonymously.  No sense in doing all this writing if no one can see it.  Well the www site was publishing fine, but the blog site wouldn’t stop requesting authentication.  It wasn’t the ISA Server, as the same thing was happening inside the network. 

    ...
    [Read More]
  • Oct.21.2009

    So I’ve attended Sean Livingston’s two upgrade sessions at the SharePoint conference today (SharePoint 2010 Upgrade Part 1: Fundamentals and SharePoint 2010 Upgrade Part 2: Advanced Scenarios) and I figure I’m ready to try upgrading a MOSS 2007 site.  What better one to start with than our public web site from www.envisionit.com.

    For those of you that don’t want to read all the sordid details, the site did upgrade quite cleanly, and is now available on http://www2010.envisionit.com/Products, running under SharePoint 2010.  It still has the old user experience, but in this case that just affects authors, and not the general public.  I’ll be working through that quite soon I’m sure.  The top level site is currently broken though, as I flipped the user experience over and I can get it back just yet.

    We need to start off with a few prerequisites here.  First and foremost there are only two versions of SharePoint you can upgrade from.  They are WSS v3 SP2 and MOSS 2007 SP2.  You have to be current on SP2, and if you’re skipping versions, you still need to migrate through 2007.  That’s fine, our site is built as a publishing site on MOSS 2007, and we’ve installed SP2, so we’re good on that side.  Next is that you have to be running 64-bit servers for BOTH SharePoint and SQL.  You can use either SQL 2005 or SQL 2008, but it has to be 64-bit.

    ...
    [Read More]
  • Oct.20.2009

    For those of you who have also made it down to the Microsoft SharePoint Conference in Las Vegas, you’ve no doubt been overwhelmed as well with the sheer quantity of information being presented.  With as many as 17 different sessions running at any one time (plus Hands On Labs and meetings), it can be hard to choose.  Needless to say there will be lots of reviewing of presentations after the fact once the videos are available.

    Now that the NDA wraps are off of SharePoint 2010, I’m going to start publishing the notes I’ve been keeping over the last few months since we got Beta 1 running in our lab back in the summer.  What better way to further our evaluation than to actually use it to host this blog.  Yes Microsoft strongly recommends that you wait to Beta 2 before running anything on SharePoint 2010, but I’ve always pushed the envelope.  I’ll just have to make sure I keep good archives in case anything goes wrong, and to help with the transition to Beta 2 and RTM.

Copyright ©2013 Peter Carson